Ocean park

Work underway to replace hurricane-depleted sand at Phipps Ocean Park

After back-to-back hurricanes depleted the sand in Phipps Ocean Park, the city began a months-long project to replace it.

As part of a $9 million beach renovation project that mirrors the one completed in Midtown Beach last May, approximately 400,000 cubic meters of sand will be dredged offshore and then placed along 1.6 miles of beach from the northern tip of Phipps Ocean Park south to RG Kreusler Park. near Lake Worth Pier.

Work has begun on a $9 million project to replace hurricane-depleted sand at Phipps Ocean Park.  About 400,000 cubic meters of sand will be dredged offshore and then placed along 1.6 miles of beach from the northern tip of Phipps Ocean Park south to RG Kreusler Park near the Lake Worth Pier.

The new sand will replace losses caused by Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and Hurricane Irma the following year.

The project also includes the storage of 85,000 cubic meters of sand that will be trucked to dune restoration areas throughout the city and South Palm Beach. This part of the project will cost about $2 million, said Rob Weber, manager of the city’s coastal program.

The work should be completed by May 1.

Continued:Palm Beach: Midtown area sand embankment expected to ramp up this month

“This feed will directly improve storm protection for Phipps Ocean Park at the Palm Worth Condominium and will include a sand storage component,” said Mayor Gail Coniglio.

A beach restoration project at Phipps Ocean Park is set to be completed May 1.  Crews replace sand lost by Hurricanes Matthew and Irma.

“When completed, every section of beach south of Sloan’s Curve to the southern city limits will have received new sand to maintain that buffer zone between our little island and the big blue ocean – just in time for hurricane season. .”

The Federal Emergency Management Agency will reimburse the city for up to 75% of the cost of the beach restoration project, Weber said. The city received grants to cover much of the remaining expenses.

South Palm Beach will reimburse the city for dune restoration work.

The Phipps Ocean Park/Reach 7 project was originally scheduled to start at the same time as the Midtown Restoration Project, but was pushed back three times, first due to a conflict with sea turtle nesting season, then due to due to objections from residents of two neighboring condominium corporations, Weber said.

Residents of the buildings at 2100 and 2000 Sloan’s Curve, just north of Phipps Ocean Park, say nearby sea sand dredging for beach embankment is causing erosion of their beach, which lies outside the fill area permitted.

Public Works Director Paul Brazil said the city will do everything possible to protect the beach in this area.

“If we did something to cause harm, we would fix it,” Brazil told the city council at its Feb. 9 meeting. “We’ve used this borrow area before and the dunes (from Sloan’s Curve buildings) are still there.”

As part of the project, Brazil said, the city will add sand to the dune system that protects buildings at 2000 and 2100 Sloan’s Curve from storms.

Similar work was completed in 2016, which was the last time Phipps Ocean Park was replenished. This project, which included all of the beaches in the South End, cost $17 million.

A sand replacement project at Phipps Ocean Park includes the storage of 85,000 cubic meters of sand that will be trucked to dune restoration areas throughout the city and South Palm Beach.

Dredging began in early March but was briefly halted last week due to bad weather, Weber said.

Weeks Marine, the contractor hired by the city for the Phipps Ocean Park project, will dredge sand from offshore and pump it onto the beaches, where bulldozers will smooth it into place.

The renovations increase the width and elevation of beaches so they can better protect upland properties from wave damage during storms, Weber said.

Portions of Phipps Park Beach where there is active sand placement are closed, Weber said, and the north parking lot is also closed. The park itself is open, as is the south parking lot.

The next planned beach restoration project is scheduled for 2024 at Phipps Ocean Park, Weber said, though a hurricane before that would alter those plans.

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